Exercises on Asking Questions – Introduction

 The following posts provide a large number of Exercises that help train People to ask questions better. Most of the exercises have suggested answers They start with very simple exercises using a series of questions. Gradually they get more complex until two exercises give a dialogue between two people that include various questions for Readers to classify.

Most of the exercises should work well since many courses have used them.

Some Related Notes

Return to top of page

Exercise – Asking Questions – No 1

1 Objective of Exercise – Help people:

(a) understand two different classes of question

(b) choose the class of question that will most help to

(i) obtain specific information or (ii) encourage people to talk.

Exercise

2 Classify the following questions into “closed” or “open” questions using the following definitions.

3 Definition of a Closed Question - Seeks to obtain specific information and encourages[1] a short and limited answer, e.g. Did you buy any ice cream?

4 Definition of an Open Question – Encourages Answer to talk and allows any length of answer, e.g. Why did you come here? What did you think of the film?

6 Put a “C” (for Closed) or  an “O” (for Open) beside each of the following questions.

Continue reading

Exercise – Asking Questions – No 1 – Answers

Introduction

1 The following Section lists the number of the question followed by a C (Closed) or O (Open) to indicate suggested answers.

2 If you disagree, try to work out why.

3 Remember some Open Questions may get a short answer.

4 Example. What do you think of the Course? - “Wonderful” “Useless”.

Continue reading

Exercise – Classfying Questions – Not in a Dialogue – Asking Questions – No 2

Introduction

1 Classify the following list of questions into one of these three classes: Direct; Leading; Assume Part of the Answer.

2 To save time, just put down a “D” (for Direct) , or an “L” (for Leading) or an “A” (Assume Part of the Answer), to the left of the question number,

3 In classifying the questions, assume each question listed occurred at the start of a conversation. In some cases the content of the question will mean that this assumption will not make much sense (eg. paragraph 5) , however just ignore that point.

Continue reading

Exercise – Asking Questions – No 2 – Answers

Introduction

1 The following Section lists the number of the question followed by a D (Direct) , L (Leading), or A (Assume Part of the Answer) – to indicate suggested answers.

2 If you disagree, try to work out why.

Answers

4 D       10 L     16 A   22 D

5 L       11 A    17 L     23 A

6 D      12 L    18 D    24 L

7 A      13 D    19 A     25 A

8 D      14 D    20 A    26 D

9 L       15 D

Comment

3 Some people will differ from some of the above if they view the world differently i.e. have different assumptions than the above answers imply

4 Examples.The supreme pessimist could say that we cannot assume the sun will rise.[1] Further, do some projects always go “right” and some situations exist that no-one can improve?

Continue reading

Exercise – Asking Questions – No 3

Altering Question Structure – while retaining the same Content

1 The following Exercise aims to help people (a) understand three different types of questions (based on the structure of a question) and (b) gain the ability to change the question type (structure) used, without changing the question content.

2 The Exercise asks the Reader to (a) classify each question listed below (starting at paragraph 7 below) into eitherDirect, Leading, or Assume Part of the Answer and (b) turn the question into the other two different types using the same question content

3 Example.IF the first exercise used the question “Do you like Ice Cream?”

(a) the first job would involve classifying the question into either Direct, Leading, or Assume Part of the Answer. This question belongs to the class – “Direct”.

(b) the second job would involve changing this question’s structure without changing its content. Turning it into a leading question would give: “You like Ice Cream don’t you?” Turning it into an Assume Part of the Answer Form would give: “How much do you like Ice Cream?”

(c) Thus you could set out your answer to the first question as under -

Direct.
Leading: “You like Ice Cream don’t you?”
Assume Part of the Answer: “How much do you like Ice Cream?”

4. Please use a separate sheet of paper to answer this exercise. This sheet does not provide sufficient room.

5 Remember, for each question, you should have three answers: first,a classification of the question; second and third,an example of the original question with the same content but a different structure. Do all of this work for each question before attempting the next question.

Continue reading

Exercise – Asking Questions – No 3 – Answers

Introduction

1 The following answers do not include all possible correct answers.

2 In all cases, a Leading (Subtle) example would provide as correct an answer as a Leading (Obvious) example.

3 In many cases, Assume-Part-of-the-Answer answers could include a variety of introductory questions, e.g. compare “How will you answer the question?” with “When will you answer the question?”

4 The paragraph numbers below refer to the paragraph numbers in the actual Exercise.

Paragraph 7

5 Direct (D)

6 Leading (L) You like the Course don’t you?

7 Assume Part of the Answer (A) : How much do you like the Course?

Continue reading

Exercise – Asking Questions – No 4

Use the same approach as in Exercise 3 with respect to the following questions.

1 You see the advantages in this product, don’t you?

2 Do you need our product?

3 How often would you use a Widget?

4 Do you understand my point?

5 What colour Widget would you like?

6 I guess you will need finance to buy this product?

Return to top of page

Some Related Notes

Return to top of page

Exercise – Asking Questions – No 4 – Answers

Introduction

1 The following answers do not include all possible correct answers.

2 In all cases, a Leading (Subtle) example would provide as correct an answer as a Leading (Obvious) example.

3 In many cases, Assume-Part-of-the-Answer answers could include a variety of introductory questions, e.g. compare “Now will you answer the question?” with When will you answer the question?”

4 The paragraph numbers below refer to the paragraph numbers in the actual Exercise.

Continue reading

Exercise – Asking Questions – No 5

Instructions

1 The interview below contains a number of questions which the Reader should classify according to the categories on the top of the separate answer sheet 1

2 Each question has a number on the Right Hand side of the page and a corresponding number exists on the separate answer sheet.

3 Tick or cross the columns in the Answer Sheet under the category to which you consider the question belongs. Classify all questions in one of the two columns under A and one of the four columns under B. Some questions also can receive a classification under one of the four columns under C.

4 Note allquestions rate as either Open or Closed. Further, question can belong to only one category in the section headed B.

5 Where two questions in the one question exist, use (a) and (b) beside the question number and classify each of the (part) questions in sections A and B.

Continue reading